#AuthorpreneurSpeak – How to Be a Guerrilla Authorpreneur by Adite Banerjie #MondayMotivation #Guestpost

For the third installment of #AuthorpreneurSpeak, I am delighted to publish the guest post by the very knowledgeable Adite Banerjie. Having seen the traditional publishing side of the ecosystem from close quarters, Adite recently turned to Indie publishing. Read on to learn from her experiences. 

There has been a tectonic shift in the publishing world in the last ten years. Getting a book contract from a traditional publisher is no longer the only way to see your name on the cover of your novel. The role of the publisher and/or agent who stand guard as gatekeepers to the publishing world has diminished. Suddenly, it is possible for writers to go directly to readers as long as there is a digital platform on which they can make their work available.

The rise of Amazon and its self-publishing platform (KDP Select) has been a game-changer in the slow-paced world of publishing. It has empowered writers by turning them into self-publishers and marketers of their own books. Speed to market which was once a term that was never attributed to book marketing has become the mantra for writers who have donned a new avatar—as entrepreneurs. Or, more accurately, authorpreneurs.

However, the word ‘authorpreneur’ is not mere jargon. It entails a shift in mindset. It   means that as a writer one is willing to dive into the business side of writing. For decades, writers have convinced themselves—and publishers have propagated this myth—that as a creative person one shouldn’t be getting his or her hands dirty in the business side of writing. But by accepting this argument the writer is signing away the right to take decisions on her own work.

Authorpreneurship offers writers the opportunity to make a call on issues that they have never had a say on—including pricing of books, cover design, marketing and more. But to be an effective authorpreneur a writer has to be willing to take the risk, change gears when required and constantly upgrade herself on the business side of writing.

Most importantly, while learning the new skills of authorpreneurship, a writer cannot forget that her book is the centrepiece around which all her strategies will revolve. So, make sure that the book is worthy enough of being professionally published.

As a newly minted authorpreneur myself, I have been keenly observing the traits of successful self-published authors. As a novice in this game I’ve realized that I need to operate more as a guerrilla authorpreneur to survive in this very competitive arena—and developing some of the following traits would be extremely beneficial.

Be creative: That’s the hallmark of a writer. But the authorpreneur needs to extend her creativity beyond writing and into marketing activities as well. Selecting an appealing cover design or communicating with readers and followers on social media platforms in a creative manner will make her efforts as an authorpreneur stand out.

Dedication: An authorpreneur is dedicated to her publishing timeline. She does not have the luxury of writing as and when the muse strikes. Time management needs to be an essential tool in the authorpreneur’s toolkit. Setting aside time for writing, marketing and online communication have to be factored into her daily schedule.

Learning and experimentation: To grow as an authorpreneur upgrading one’s skillsets is essential. One needs to keep learning from fellow self-publishers and the plethora of online resources that are available freely. But just because some tools have worked for one authorpreneur, there is no guarantee that it will work for another. While experimenting, exercising caution is important and instead of spending a bunch of money—say on a Facebook ad—it would be best to spend small amounts and keep a record of the impact. Every investment has a risk attached to it and being prepared for it is the best way forward.

Reining in expectations: It’s best to be conservative when it comes to estimating earnings from self-publishing ventures. As an authorpreneur’s backlist grows and her skills keep pace, her hard work and dedication are bound to pay off.

Self-Publishing is the way to go if a writer wants control over her creative work. Besides being a very empowering process, it can also be a lot of fun.

Happy Authorpreneuring! 🙂

After five years of being traditionally published, Adite Banerjie has chosen to become an authorpreneur. You can find her books on Amazon. Also connect with her via her website and Facebook Page

 

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#AuthorpreneurSpeak – “Living the dream” by Devika Fernando #Motivation

After last week’s featuring of Sudesna Ghosh’s “Becoming an authorpreneur, we have Devika Fernando, an entrepreneur, a writer and a wonderful individual, candidly sharing how she got to live her dream. Read on.

For me, words always held magic. I grew up being read to every day, then quickly moved on to reading even before I ‘officially’ learned reading and writing at school. My love with reading led to a love for writing at an early age. I remember writing my first (very) short poems and short stories when I was seven years old. But then life happened. Studies and growing up as well as the realities of moving and taking on responsibilities got in the way of writing, although I never stopped being a voracious reader.

In my late teenage years, I read my first books by Anne Rice and then devoured all the Vampire Chronicles novels. It was then that I truly said for the first time that “I want to be a writer”. But it was a somewhat vague concept, overshadowed by the fact that it all seemed nearly impossible. It remained a dream for many years during which I kept jotting down story ideas, poems and stories, now in English more than in German because I began to read more and more books in English.

Fast forward to 2013, when I finally decided to make my dream reality and turn a hobby into a job. I stumbled upon the concept of self-publishing online and suddenly it seemed as if a new world had opened up, full of possibilities (and challenges). What had always just been a fantasy vaguely associated with rejections and final fame or a lonely existence and failure was now something that could be approached like a freelance job. And I vowed: I wouldn’t “dabble” in writing or take anything for granted. I would try to make the most of the opportunities and become an authorpreneur.

A common definition for authorpreneur is an author who also acts like an entrepreneur. That basically means you don’t simply write a book but also promote it actively, work with certain tools of the trade and create your own brand. The last part is one of the most important aspects and something an authorpreneur should never lose focus of. It’s not merely about the books, it’s what is associated with the writing and the author. Authorpreneurs need to find their USP and build their author platform on it – whether they specialize in short and hot reads, a certain type of paranormal topics, forbidden romances, a certain language style or something similar like my multicultural romances set in different countries. Part of the author brand are covers, website, social media appearances and promotional methods.

All this can make it difficult to not forget the actual writing, so what I try is to take this as seriously as possible and allocate time to all aspects. I’ll start in the morning by checking my social media accounts and e-mails as well as my book sales and any promotional campaigns that might be running. Then throughout the day – to make use of different time zones – I keep interacting, posting and promoting. I also make sure I write a certain amount of words per day, preferably a complete scene or even a chapter. I don’t permit myself to seek excuses. To me, there is no “writer’s block” or “my muse has gone silent”. I’m the driving force and this is my responsibility on which my success depends. That is, in my opinion, one of the biggest challenges of doing this and also the main aspect that separates an authorpreneur from an author.

I consider myself lucky that I have been able to make a dream come true and that I have the means to be an author, so I make sure I live up to it. A doctor doesn’t refrain from operating because they lack “inspiration”. A teacher doesn’t earn their salary by letting things rest and hoping for a miracle. Likewise, an authorpreneur doesn’t rely on luck and should – in my humble opinion – bring more than creativity to the business.

Do check out the books authored by Devika here.

#AuthorpreneurSpeak Becoming an Authorpreneur – Guestpost by Sudesna Ghosh #MondayMotivation

From today on wards, you shall read a guest post by a successful Author Entrepreneur on my blog, every Monday. I am excited to present the highly talented multi genre writer Sudesna (Sue) Ghosh.

I grew up wanting to be a writer. From writing and sharing my short stories in elementary school to writing short stories for newspapers and magazines in my adulthood, I was always sure about what I wanted to do. The trouble is, the idea of being a writer is a romantic one until you start taking it seriously. Until you start learning about what it entails to be a writer, you dream about writing novels in coffee shops, becoming famous like Rowling and earning millions with your first book. Cut to reality and then you find out how unglamorous and sometimes, non-rewarding the writer’s life can be. In fact, writing is the best reward that you can get as a writer. Writing from your heart and soul – without giving a damn about all those dreams you had before. Instead, the happiest writers are those of us who stay immersed in the satisfaction of writing
what nourishes us. Of course it’s nice to get appreciation but you shouldn’t depend too much on that.

When I was leaving my full-time job at a major newspaper, colleagues warned me about the stupidity of leaving without a full-time job offer in my hands. I told them that I would be writing full time but from home. As a freelancer. “But X and Y left the job saying that they would write a book too and they never did,” one of them said. Well, I told her that I was not X or Y and quite stubborn about doing what I wanted to do. So I spoke with confidence and left with a couple of freelance clients to help me stay afloat.

That was early 2012. In 2013, I did a little networking as freelancers must do at all times and was introduced to the then head of publishing at Harlequin India. Nonfiction writing came easily to me as an ex-journalist and features writer but I had never thought that my first book would be nonfiction. The second book too. But that’s how I got started in the world of publishing, sending sample chapters and proposals and being commissioned to write two books for the publisher.

Two books down the line, I realised many things that drove me toward the path of authorpreneurship. First, that traditional publishing took time – publishers took at least 1 and half years to publish an approved manuscript because there’s just too many books slotted every month. Second, the advance royalty payment was not going to keep my bank balance happy for long. And finally, I wanted to write in various genres and in multiple lengths including short stories which aren’t that easy to get published with a traditional publisher. No, I needed another way to get my writing out there and to get paid for it too.

That’s when I started doing daily research on self publishing and found out the importance of cover design, editing and promotion. Promotion or book marketing, has been an eye opening experience. I have read so many books and articles on the subject and have become addicted to it in a way. Social media marketing is a skill that we indie authors NEED. There is a large audience to tap into and there are ways to make it less time consuming by using scheduling software or even hiring an assistant if you can afford it. In May, I took a Google online course and received a certificate in Online Marketing Fundamentals just because I now know that good online marketing can make or break a book. Or your author brand for that matter.

These days I do live a part of the dream by writing in a coffee shop three days a week. But I also spend a couple of hours a day on social media platforms where I engage with my readers and other writers. Once a week, I make posts using software such as Canva to keep them ready for social media posts. My blog has been online since 2011 but I started taking it seriously only last year after I became an authorpreneur, so I update that twice a week. Keeping my audience interested and attracting more readers is the key to an authorpreneur’s success. Writing the book is just a small part of it.

I identify as an authorpreneur and not just an author because I treat my job as a small business. That involves being disciplined enough to write multiple books during the year, not take breaks from social media promotion, engaging online and offline with readers and other authors all year round, and keeping track of expenses (cover, editing etc) along with monthly income from royalty, freelance articles and speaking engagements/workshops. It’s a lot of work but so worth it as any authorpreneur will tell you!

Hope you loved the post as much as I did! Don’t forget to check out more of Sue’s writings on Amazon and her very insightful and engaging blog.

Spotlight – Let’s talk money by Monika Halan #HotNewRelease #Personalfinance #Amreading

Delighted to share about this wonderful book of personal finance by none other than Monika Halan, the consultant editor at Mint with tons of experience in the area and a great heart that wanted to share her precious insights.

I am halfway through Let’s talk money and felt it would be criminal not to spread the word about such an empowering book. Shall review the book in detail a bit later. Check out the blurb below :

We work hard to earn our money. But regardless of how much we earn, the money worry never goes away. Bills, rent, EMIs, medical costs, vacations, kids’ education and, somewhere at the back of the head, the niggling thought about being under-prepared for our own retirement. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if our money worked for us just as we work hard for it? What if we had a proven system to identify dud investment schemes? What if could just plug seamlessly into a simple, jargon-free plan to get more value out of our money, and have a super good life today? India’s most trusted name in personal finance, Monika Halan offers you a feet-on-the-ground system to build financial security. Not a get-rich-quick guide, this book helps you build a smart system to live your dream life, rather than stay worried about the ‘right’ investment or ‘perfect’ insurance. Unlike many personal finance books, Let’s Talk Money is written specifically for you, keeping the Indian context in mind.

Let's Talk Money_Front

I even have an exclusive excerpt for you, with the kind permission from the author and the publishing team of Harper Collins.

Kanchan Chander is a famous Delhi-based artist; you can spot her on page 3 of the daily tabloids grinning at the camera. I happened to meet her at the home of a common friend. And as it played out, the conversation soon shifted to her money. (There was not much I knew about art anyway.) She was in the middle of a story that I had now heard hundreds of times. A pushy bank relationship manager promises a wonder insurance-cum-investment product; you trust your bank; you grew up in a time when insurance meant safety and good return, along with tax breaks. This relationship manager is very persuasive, calls many times, is very charming, looks sincerely into your eyes and gives his personal promise about the product; I’m there, he says. Kanchan’s story was no different. She wanted to put away a lump sum for two years so that she could fund her son’s art-school education in the UK. However, she was sold a fifteen-year regular-premium unit-linked insurance plan some years ago by her bank. She thought she was buying a two-year fixed deposit, but the bank had put her in a regular-premium long-term investment. She got a shock when a year later she got a message from the insurance company saying that the second premium is due. But, she had made a one-time investment, she thought. So she called her bank relationship manager. He had gone. Another smart slick-suit was there who told her that if she did not make the payment she’d lose the entire investment to costs (which she was not told at the time of investment). She protested. You signed the policy, so you should have known this, was the push back. Kanchan was devastated. Artists’ incomes are erratic and she had been banking on this money to fund her son’s education, and now it was gone. As a single parent, the blow was even harder. There was nobody to fall back upon. Chances are that you’ve already had at least one bad insurance experience by now. Either you would have got back a pittance after faithfully servicing your policy for twenty years, or you would have got trapped in a product you did not want. Or been brazenly lied to and left holding a dud product. Why do they cheat and what can you do to stay safe? Do you really need an insurance cover? What about the tax break – how will you get that if you don’t buy another policy? I’m going to take each question and then leave you with some very simple dos and don’ts. You need to treat the insurance industry and those who sell the same like walking through reptile-infested waters; you need to stay on the path that is safe. They’re out to get you. You need to look after your money. I’m not joking.

Hope you are compelled enough to check out the book on Amazon!

About the Author

Monika Halan is consulting editor and part of the leadership team at Mint. A certified financial planner, she has served as editor of Outlook Money and worked in some of India’s top media organizations, including the Indian Express, the Economic Times and Business Today. She has run four successful TV series around personal finance advice, on NDTV, Zee and Bloomberg India, and is a regular speaker on financial literacy, regulation and consumer issues in retail finance. As part of her public policy service, she is a member of SEBI’s Mutual Fund Advisory Committee. She lives in New Delhi and tweets at @monikahalan.

 

Spotlight – Bombay Heights by Adite Banerjie

Wishing friend and author Adite Banerjie all the best upon the release of her new novel Bombay Heights. My short stint in Mumbai, city of dreams has left me a lot of sweet memories. Hoping to relive them in this sweet Rom Com.

Bombay_Heights

Here is the Blurb:

A FEEL-GOOD ROMANTIC COMEDY

Small town girl Sanjana Kale wants a fresh start in Mumbai. A challenging job and some much needed distance from her ludicrously over-protective family could get her life under control.

Forced to team up with video game designer Ashwin Deo, who is too attractive for his own good, she finds life becoming a whole lot more complicated when he turns out to be her new neighbour.  How can she maintain a professional distance with this charming troublemaker who believes in getting up close and personal?

To make matters worse, her ex tries to manipulate her loved ones to work his way back into her life. Hysterical siblings, a cantankerous client, an ex who will not take no for an answer, and a blow hot blow cold neighbour… Sanjana is sleepless in the City of Dreams! Can she do what Ashwin dares her to–create a few ripples even if it upsets her family?

 

Excerpt:

The promenade in front of the beach was chock-a-block with morning walkers, joggers and yoga enthusiasts. The Laughing Club members were at it—raising their arms to heaven and laughing their guts out.

Ashwin Deo gazed lazily at the sight around him. If it weren’t for Dumbass, he would be sleeping off his dreadful hangover.  The dratted critter gave two sharp yelps. Good God! He had been saddled with a mind reading dog? The Lhasa Apso was peering at him with brown soulful eyes that would melt the hardest of hearts.

“Okay. I got you here, right? Do me a favour and do what you need to.”

The dog gave a massive tug on his leash and Ashwin lurched forward, nearly crashing into a woman in canary yellow yoga pants and matching T-shirt. His eyes hurt at the bright colours and he mumbled an apology before being dragged ahead by the dog.

“Dumbass!” he yelled firmly. And the dog came to a halt.

“That’s more like it.” He lowered himself on his haunches and peered into the mutt’s eyes. “Let’s get this straight. We keep it civilized. You walk calmly, do your thing and we go back home. Got it?”

The dog’s tongue lolled out from the side of his mouth as he gave Ashwin a beseeching look following it up with a quick lick on his bare knee.

“Right. So, slow and easy. No pulling, okay?”

Another swift lick.

“Thanks, bro. I think we got a deal. Let’s go.”

Ashwin raised his towering six foot frame and taking deep breaths kept moving along, his eyes narrowing painfully as the hangover continued to hammer away at his head.

Barely had they walked a few paces when Dumbass broke into a series of high-pitched yelps and tugged. Before Ashwin had figured out what was going on, Dumbass gave a mighty yank. The strap tore out of his hand and the dog was hurtling down the promenade at top speed.

“Goddammit! Stop, Dumbass!”

Walkers turned around to give Ashwin funny looks as he took off after the dog.

Every stride sent pain shooting up into his head which threatened to split wide open. The cacophony of screeching tyres, frightened squeals of onlookers and a dashing ball of fur brought him to a standstill.

He bounded on to the street and came to a halt at the sight of Dumbass lying prone in the middle of the road, his lead tangled under the car tyre.

Oh no!

He heard the car door open and someone step out, yelling loudly, “Why in God’s name can’t you control your dog?”

As Ashwin inched forward to pick up the dog, he heard a woman’s lilting voice, “That was close. The leash got tangled under the tyre but he doesn’t seem to be hurt.”

Ashwin let out the breath he was holding and reached out to pick up Dumbass. The mutt was winded but breathing. There was no blood and as soon as he touched him, Dumbass leaped into his arms and did his lickety-spit number.

“You gave me the fright of my life,” he muttered as he got up and turned around.

The driver was only too glad that the creature was alive and kicking. Getting into the car, he ranted about irresponsible dog owners and drove off.

The woman whose voice he had heard said, “Poor thing must have gotten such a fright!”

That’s when he noticed her. She looked like a college student with her long waist-length hair tied casually with a silk scarf. Her big, dark eyes shone with compassion as she leaned slightly towards him to pet Dumbass and a fruity perfume assailed him. Her thick eyelashes swept up and she turned her gaze on him.

“Never been so scared.” He gave her his best hangdog look.

“I was talking about him!”

“Dumbass.”

“Excuse me? Did you just call me, Dumbass?” Her eyes sparkled with annoyance and he came back to his senses with a start.

“No…his name.”

He cursed his blasted headache which made talking such a goddamn effort. She looked at him as if he had some kind of mental disability.

He smiled with effort.  “Perfect name for a dog with no sense of self preservation, right?”

She glared back at him. “What about the owner who thinks he has no responsibility for his dog’s welfare?”

He took a few deep breaths. “I can explain.”

“Never mind. Just make sure you take him to a vet. There might be some internal injury.”

She gave Dumbass a last pat, bestowed a dirty glare on him and jogged away.

—-

To read more, click on the Buy links below:

Amazon India 

Amazon US

About the Author

Adite Banerjie discovered the wonderful world of books at an early age which sparked her interest in writing. After a fulfilling and exciting career as a business journalist she turned her attention to fiction.

Three of her books have been published by Harlequin/Harper Collins India. She is now committed to being an indie author.

She also writes screenplays and in 2017 one of her scripts made it to the semi-finals of the prestigious Academy Nicholl Fellowships.

When she is not grappling with her current work-in-progress, she enjoys spending time with her husband and watching back-to-back movies.

She loves to connect with her readers at:
Website: http://www.aditebanerjie.com
Amazon: https://amazon.com/author/aditebanerjie
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AditeBanerjieWriter
Twitter: @adite
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7083664.Adite_Banerjie

The Writerpreneur Series. On the Indie author’s journey

Sharing knowledge is something that motivates me. I think highly of those who do it religiously. After publishing three novels on the Indie publishing mode, bagging a traditional publishing contract (which may be on its way to span multiple books) and gaining attention from the right corners, I really want to grab this opportunity to play the role of an enabler too.

Over the next few months, I shall post an article every week sharing my experience about various milestones of Indie publishing. The topics span writing, editing, publishing, marketing and book reviews relevant to the area. While I shall try my best to order the posts, many of them would be spontaneously written, often inspired by my conversations with aspiring writers.  Hope to make ad offer a booklet of all the posts once they reach a logical completion.

Those who are interested in my past posts, please click here to access them. 

You could also suggest me topics to dwell on or feel free to ask questions that nag you in the comment section. I welcome interacting with you all.

Keep watching the space.